April 17, 2006

Thought for the day

What is the use of a house if you don't have a decent planet to put it on?
-- Henry David Thoreau

3 comments:

Steve S. said...

Wasn't he the guy who responded to the invention of the telephone with "But what if I have nothing to say to the people in florida?"

DeMar said...

Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862; born David Henry Thoreau) was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, pacifist, tax resister and philosopher who is famous for Walden, on simple living amongst nature, and On the Duty of Civil Disobedience, on resistance to civil government and many other articles and essays. He was a lifelong abolitionist, delivering lectures that attacked the Fugitive Slave Law while praising the writings of Wendell Phillips and defending the abolitionist John Brown. Among his lasting contributions were his writings on natural history and philosophy, where he anticipated the methods and findings of ecology and environmental history, two sources of modern day environmentalism.

Steve S. said...

"If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them."

"Men have become the tools of their tools"

I almost used that first quote in a sermon...